Study Uses Injection To Dramatically Reduce Cholesterol

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If you are visiting our website, chances are you already know that high cholesterol can be genetically inherited. People who have hereditary high cholesterol, such as those with Familial Hypercholesterolemia, have increased LDL levels (“bad cholesterol”) in spite of their diet, not because of it. There are different cholesterol-lowering treatments available such as statins, niacin, bile acid sequestrants, and even apheresis (a blood-cleansing procedure used when medication isn’t effective enough). However, researchers in Houston may have found a game changer.

Dr. Christie Ballantyne who practices at Baylor College of Medicine is conducting a study on a lipid-lowering shot, which reduces LDL-cholesterol levels by about 50-60%. This injection is among several drug experiments that target the genetic cause of high cholesterol. Terry Lim, a patient who experienced a heart attack at 34 due to high cholesterol, is one of the participants in the study.  Many like her don’t find out their abnormal cholesterol levels are caused by a genetic defect until they have a cardiac event.

Dr. Ballantyne is on the Scientific Advisory Board of the FH Foundation and we are honored that his work fulfills the mission of the organization to find ways for people with FH to live longer, healthier lives. Currently, only volunteers in the study have access to this drug. If you have FH and are interested in participating in this experiment, please call 713 798 3330 or email ccdp@bcm.edu

One Response to “Study Uses Injection To Dramatically Reduce Cholesterol”

  1. Diana B. Rosenblum q

    I live in Long Island (Nassau County), N.Y. My zip is 11554…

    I have hereditary high cholesterol though I maintain a low fat, healthy diet…I am healthy in every other respect.. have had adverse reactions to all oral cholesterol lowering medications…I am interested in being treated with your cholesterol lowering injection…

    Is there an MD in my area. Zip : 11554 who administers this injection.

    Thank you for your prompt reply,
    Diana B. Rosenblum

    Reply

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